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Hazards Associated with Rooftop Safety

11 October 2017

Dealing with roof problems on your own can be tempting. With the advent of do-it-yourself (DIY) projects that guarantee great results for a bargain, more people are opting for DIY, instead of hiring roofing professionals because they are motivated by the belief that they will save money. But it is exactly this kind of thinking that has gotten hundreds of homeowners into dangerous (and costly) situations; situations that have ended in hospitalization and additional expenses on repairs.

It seems that many property owners are unaware of the hazards associated with rooftop safety, thankfully there is information below to help educate people about the concerns of rooftop hazards.

Common Rooftop Safety Hazards

1. Falls and injury. The risk of falling is great when traversing on roofs, particularly for people who are not trained and equipped properly with safety gear. The lack of safety equipment such as portable railings and a harness can increase your chances of getting slipping and falling when traversing from one part of the roof to the other. However, equipping yourself is not enough.

Without training, you might not only slip and fall when walking on the roof, but you could also unknowingly cause damage to your roof.

2. Roof integrity and ladder placement.
For people without any knowledge or training on how to mount a roof, it can very difficult to determine which areas are solid enough to step on, without causing damaging to the roof. Professionals, on the other hand, can determine if the underlayment of a roof is structurally sound before performing roof maintenance services.

Proper placement of the ladder is also very important, since it too has been known to cause not only roof and gutter damage, but personal injuries when improperly placed and used to mount roofs.

3. Split-level type roofs. Roofs with a split-level design have unprotected sides and edges, which can further increase the risk of falling and damage caused by improper placement of ladders against the roof and gutter.

4. Roof height. The height of a roof can also increase the risk of injury that is because the higher you go the more dangerous it becomes. Any height that reaches 6 feet or more will require protective equipment to prevent falls.

5. Training and preparation.
Cleaning and maintaining a roof is no simple task, and there are many aspects of the process that requires training, to prevent personal injury and property damage. These include edge awareness, or being constantly aware of roof edges to prevent accidents, and the proper application of safety gear.

Thankfully in Auckland, professionals like Johnson Roofing Ltd. are fully equipped and trained to take care of your roofing problems, safely and efficiently.

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